It’s what Tiger does next that counts

Tiger Woods was a rare breed. A phenomenal athlete who delivered consistent record-shattering victories on and off the course with style, grace and integrity. In an intense game like golf, Tiger built his reputation by performing under pressure. Tiger transcended from being one of the best athletes ever to being one of the best celebrity brands ever. That was then, this is now. The world’s good boy has suddenly gone bad. The guy who seemed to be perfect in every way has been discovered to be a mere mortal like the rest of us. Tiger’s fall from grace is a catastrophe we have never seen before because Tiger was a brand we have never seen before. Tiger’s image was so pure, so squeaky clean and so universally appealing that his God-like status, his walking-on-water video and the founding of the First Church of Tiger Woods all seemed so well-deserved.

GM & the Implication of the Opposite

Sometimes the harder you try, the worse off you are. Why is that? Branding can sometimes be like trying to pick up girls. It is not what you say that counts. But the implication of what you say that counts. When crafting their advertising messages, too many marketers forget about this principle. As a result, while even if they are telling the truth all they do is convince consumers of the opposite.

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