BP has a Brand Problem

BP talked the talk but never walked the walk. Like many companies in unpopular industries, BP launched a massive advertising campaign to put a little lipstick on the oil pig. Advertising is not very good at changing strongly-held perceptions, but in BP’s case it actually worked. However, the “holier than thou” tone of BP’s advertising placed the company on a perilously high green pedestal it was sure to fall from.

What should Goldman Do?

What does Goldman Sachs need to do to save its brand? In a word, nothing. A powerful, leading brand is practically bullet-proof. It’s not what you do wrong that determines if your brand will survive a scandal. It’s how strong your brand is in the mind that determines if your brand will survive. Strong brands survive even the worst catastrophes, while weak ones can easily be destroyed by minor ones.

Verizon and its Atomic Bomb

In the current Cellphone War, Verizon has dropped the atomic bomb of marketing on rival AT&T. Marketing wars are fought with lots of words, but wars are won when you combine your words with a visual. Verizon has done just that.

It’s what Tiger does next that counts

Tiger Woods was a rare breed. A phenomenal athlete who delivered consistent record-shattering victories on and off the course with style, grace and integrity. In an intense game like golf, Tiger built his reputation by performing under pressure. Tiger transcended from being one of the best athletes ever to being one of the best celebrity brands ever. That was then, this is now. The world’s good boy has suddenly gone bad. The guy who seemed to be perfect in every way has been discovered to be a mere mortal like the rest of us. Tiger’s fall from grace is a catastrophe we have never seen before because Tiger was a brand we have never seen before. Tiger’s image was so pure, so squeaky clean and so universally appealing that his God-like status, his walking-on-water video and the founding of the First Church of Tiger Woods all seemed so well-deserved.

Under Armour: Too Big for its Shirt?

It's amazing how many of the world's most successful entrepreneurs quickly forget what made them famous. The latest example is Kevin Plank, CEO of Under Armour. What made Under Armour famous? It wasn't a Super Bowl ad. It wasn't a massive marketing campaign. It wasn't ego or hype. What made Under Armour famous was "performance apparel" a new category Kevin created and carefully nurtured.

Why stop at HealthCare?

If President Obama truly wants to be a revolutionary leader he should not overlook other major issues plaguing our people. After he installs nationalized HealthCare, there are many other programs he might consider adding. Why should Obama stop with Government HealthCare? Why not, FoodCare, ChildCare, ClothesCare, ShelterCare and ComputerCare too?

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