Hashtag Branding – How to not get burned

Hashtag Branding – How to not get burned

Starbucks, like most companies these days, is obsessed with buzz. Not the kind you get from a double-espresso but the kind you find online with tweets, hashtags and likes. It used to be that the major media outlets controlled the conversation. Today, consumers via social media have the power to start, join or change the conversation. The media covers the buzz instead of creating it. As a result, companies are trying harder than ever to encourage consumers to start conversations online with hashtag campaigns.

Super Bowl 2015

We saw fewer special effects, sexy girls and kicks to the crotch this year. And the few that took that route fell flat. What did score big is what always scores big. Ads from brands that own strong positions in the mind, that dominate categories and that hammer us with a familiar theme and visual in a new and entertaining way. Budweiser, Snickers, Doritos and Always scored big.

High Hopes for Marley

The Weed Wars are coming. As the legalization of marijuana continues to move forward, we will see hundreds of homegrown brands turn into a handful of big brands and eventually a couple of dominant brands. It happened with cars; it happened with beer; it happened with computers; it happened with energy drinks. It will happen with marijuana.

Burger King loses its way

What kills most marketing programs is “change.”
When you keep changing your slogans, you confuse consumers and after a while they don’t attention to what you are trying to say.
Over the years, Burger King has had a lot of slogans. Remember “Where is Herb?” Burger King spent over $40 million trying to find him. They never did!

Super Bowl 2014

Unless you were a Seattle fan, the 2014 Super Bowl wasn’t a super game to watch. The puppy bowl was more competitive. So that left a lot of pressure on the commercials to deliver some much needed excitement and entertainment. A few spots delivered but most were not very memorable. One thing that continues to make the difference between failure and success is the use of a consistent visual hammer.